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Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
9 terms share this root
Adductor magnus

The "great" muscle that "leads" the thigh "near" to the midline of the body, and helps to flex the knee.

  • Ad (Latin) - Near, At, To Add On
  • Ducere (Latin) - To Lead
  • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
  • Pubofemoral part goes from pubic ramus to medial femur
  • Ischiocondylar part from the ischial tuberosity to the medial condyle of the femur
  • Innervated by obturator and tibial nerve
  • Called the great mover towards because of both its size and immense strength in its action of moving the leg towards the body
  • It is a large triangular muscle with 3 separate insertions onto the femur
  • Foramen magnum

    "Large" "opening" at the bottom of the occipital bone, through which the spinal canal, vertebral arteries, spinal arteries, and CN XI travel.

    • Foramen (Latin) - Hole, opening, aperture, orifice
    • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
    Labia minora/majora

    They are atomical structures of the female genital tract and are the major externally visible portions of the vulva. "Labia" means lip.

  • The labia surround and protect the clitoris and the openings of the vagi and urethra.
  • Major histocompatibility complex

    The "great" or large "webbed tissue" that "suffers with" interacting with white blood cells of the immune system.

  • Set of cell surface molecules that mediates interactions with white blood cells. There are three major classes
  • Involved in organ transplant compatibility, autoimmune diseases, infections, and malignancy
  • Genes were first identified in an experiment that found rejection of transplanted tumors in mice depended on the strain of both the host and donor tumor.
  • Pectoralis major

    The "large" muscle in the anterior "chest."

    • Pectus (Latin) - Breast
    • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
  • Muscle in anterior chest which medially rotates upper extremity
  • Poland's syndrome is congenitally missing one pectoris major
  • Proximally attached at clavicle and sternum
  • Distally attached at the bicipital groove of humerus
  • Innervated by the lateral pectoral nerve
  • Poland's syndrome is congenitally missing one pectoris major
  • Proximally attached at clavicle and sternum
  • Distally attached at the bicipital groove of humerus
  • Psoas major

    The "larger" muscle of the "loin region".

    • Psoa (Greek) - Loin region
    • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
  • Long muscle that begins along the lumbar region of the vertebral column and joins with the iliacus to form the iliopsoas
  • Hip flexor
  • The psoas major is the cut of meat from a cow we commonly know as the "filet mignon".
  • Rectus capitus posterior major

    The "greater" or bigger of the pair of "straight" muscles "behind" the "head".

    • Rectus (Latin) - Straight
    • Caput (Latin) - Head
    • Post (Latin) - Behind, afterward
    • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
  • Minor muscle
  • Postural muscle
  • Weak lateral flexion of head
  • C1/C2 nerve innervation
  • Rhomboid major

    "Rhombus""like" "great" upper back muscle that connects the medial border of the scapula to the vertebrae.

    • Rhombos (Greek) - A magician's circle
    • Eidos (Greek) - Form, Resemblance or Shape, Likeness
    • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
  • Innervated by the dorsal scapular nerve
  • Fixes scapula to the thoracic wall
  • Involved in retraction of the scapula.
  • Teres major

    The teres major connects the inferior angle of the scapula to the humerus. It functions to medially rotate and Adduct the arm.

    • Teres (Latin) - Rounded
    • Magnus (Latin) - Great in size, Greater
  • Arm Adduction
  • Arm medial rotation
  • MEDYMOLOGY